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Thomas McGaughey
Special Teams Coordinator
College:
Houston
Experience:
11

Bio

COACHING
Thomas McGaughey is in his second season as Carolina's special teams coordinator in 2017. Initially hired as Carolina's assistant special teams coach in February of 2016, McGaughey was named special teams coordinator six months later when the late Bruce DeHaven transitioned to the role of senior advisor to special teams.

Under McGaughey, the Panthers led the NFL and tied the team record with three blocked field goals. Rookie defensive tackle Vernon Butler accounted for two of the blocks, equaling Julius Peppers' team record for the most blocked field goals in a season. Carolina's kickoff coverage unit limited opponents to an average of 18.1 yards per return, the top mark in the NFL, and ranked fifth with an average drive start of the 23.7-yard line.

McGaughey joined Carolina from the San Francisco 49ers, where he was the special teams coordinator in 2015. The 49ers ranked second in the league with four blocked field goals and eighth in punt coverage, allowing an average of just 6.4 yards per return. Kicker Phil Dawson's 88.9 field goal percentage stood eighth in the NFL.

As the New York Jets special teams coordinator in 2014, McGaughey's kickoff units excelled. The Jets' kickoff return team finished fifth in the NFL with an average drive start of the 24.1-yard line, while the kickoff coverage group led all teams in tackles inside the 20-yard line and rated seventh by limiting opponents to an average of 21.8 yards per return. Kicker Nick Folk placed third in the league with 32 made field goals.

From 2011-13, McGaughey served as the special teams coordinator/defensive assistant at Louisiana State, winning the Southeastern Conference Championship in 2011. During his three seasons, the Tigers scored seven touchdowns on special teams, and he coached three All-Americans among more than 40 future NFL players. Odell Beckham, Jr. and Tyrann Mathieu earned honors as returners, and Brad Wing garnered recognition as a punter.

Prior to Louisiana State, McGaughey was the assistant special teams coordinator with the New York Giants from 2007-10. In 2008, he helped produce the Pro Bowl battery of kicker John Carney, punter Jeff Feagles and long snapper Zak DeOssie as the Giants won the NFC East. That same year, Carney set a team record by converting 92.1 percent (35-of-38) of his field goal attempts. The Giants capped McGaughey's first season in 2007 with a victory in Super Bowl XLII.

He came to the Giants following two seasons as the assistant special teams coordinator with the Denver Broncos from 2005-06. In 2006, the Broncos held opponents to an average of 6.9 yards per punt return, the fifth-best figure in the NFL, and kicker Jason Elam set a then-franchise record with a 93.1 (27-of-29) field goal percentage, which ranked second in the league. The previous year, McGaughey assisted with special teams units that contributed to the Broncos going 13-3, winning the AFC West and advancing to the AFC Championship.

In 2003, McGaughey returned to his alma mater, the University of Houston, for two seasons. While with the Cougars, he worked as the special teams coordinator in 2003 and added cornerbacks coach to his responsibilities in 2004.

After getting his start in the NFL as an intern in the Houston Texans' pro scouting department in 2001, McGaughey gained experience coaching on the professional level as a minority intern with the Kansas City Chiefs during training camp in 2001 before being hired as an assistant special teams coach in 2002. McGaughey worked with Hall of Fame kicker Morten Anderson and Pro Bowl punt returner Dante Hall who tied for the league lead with three combined kick return touchdowns in 2002.

In between his internship and full-time position with the Chiefs, McGaughey spent the spring of 2002 in NFL Europe as the Scottish Claymores defensive backs coach and special teams coordinator, helping the team rank at or near the top of the league in punting average, punt return average, kickoff return average and field goal percentage.

McGaughey began his coaching career at Houston as a graduate assistant in 1997 and next handled defensive backs and special teams at Willowridge High School in Houston from 1998-2001.

PLAYING AND PERSONAL
McGaughey played safety for four seasons and was special teams captain as a senior in 1995 at Houston, where he majored in kinesiology and sports administration. He attended training camp with the Cincinnati Bengals in 1996 and spent time on the Philadelphia Eagles’ practice squad later that year. McGaughey then played in NFL Europe and was a member of the Barcelona Dragons team that won the World Bowl in 1997. Last name is pronounced muh-GAY-hee.

HISTORY
Safety: Houston 1991-95. Pro safety: Philadelphia Eagles 1996, Barcelona Dragons (NFLE) 1997. College coach: Houston 1997, 2003-04, Louisiana State 2011-13. Pro coach: Kansas City Chiefs 2002, Denver Broncos 2005-06, New York Giants 2007-10, New York Jets 2014, San Francisco 49ers 2015, joined Panthers in 2016.
COACHING
Thomas McGaughey is in his second season as Carolina's special teams coordinator in 2017. Initially hired as Carolina's assistant special teams coach in February of 2016, McGaughey was named special teams coordinator six months later when the late Bruce DeHaven transitioned to the role of senior advisor to special teams.

Under McGaughey, the Panthers led the NFL and tied the team record with three blocked field goals. Rookie defensive tackle Vernon Butler accounted for two of the blocks, equaling Julius Peppers' team record for the most blocked field goals in a season. Carolina's kickoff coverage unit limited opponents to an average of 18.1 yards per return, the top mark in the NFL, and ranked fifth with an average drive start of the 23.7-yard line.

McGaughey joined Carolina from the San Francisco 49ers, where he was the special teams coordinator in 2015. The 49ers ranked second in the league with four blocked field goals and eighth in punt coverage, allowing an average of just 6.4 yards per return. Kicker Phil Dawson's 88.9 field goal percentage stood eighth in the NFL.

As the New York Jets special teams coordinator in 2014, McGaughey's kickoff units excelled. The Jets' kickoff return team finished fifth in the NFL with an average drive start of the 24.1-yard line, while the kickoff coverage group led all teams in tackles inside the 20-yard line and rated seventh by limiting opponents to an average of 21.8 yards per return. Kicker Nick Folk placed third in the league with 32 made field goals.

From 2011-13, McGaughey served as the special teams coordinator/defensive assistant at Louisiana State, winning the Southeastern Conference Championship in 2011. During his three seasons, the Tigers scored seven touchdowns on special teams, and he coached three All-Americans among more than 40 future NFL players. Odell Beckham, Jr. and Tyrann Mathieu earned honors as returners, and Brad Wing garnered recognition as a punter.

Prior to Louisiana State, McGaughey was the assistant special teams coordinator with the New York Giants from 2007-10. In 2008, he helped produce the Pro Bowl battery of kicker John Carney, punter Jeff Feagles and long snapper Zak DeOssie as the Giants won the NFC East. That same year, Carney set a team record by converting 92.1 percent (35-of-38) of his field goal attempts. The Giants capped McGaughey's first season in 2007 with a victory in Super Bowl XLII.

He came to the Giants following two seasons as the assistant special teams coordinator with the Denver Broncos from 2005-06. In 2006, the Broncos held opponents to an average of 6.9 yards per punt return, the fifth-best figure in the NFL, and kicker Jason Elam set a then-franchise record with a 93.1 (27-of-29) field goal percentage, which ranked second in the league. The previous year, McGaughey assisted with special teams units that contributed to the Broncos going 13-3, winning the AFC West and advancing to the AFC Championship.

In 2003, McGaughey returned to his alma mater, the University of Houston, for two seasons. While with the Cougars, he worked as the special teams coordinator in 2003 and added cornerbacks coach to his responsibilities in 2004.

After getting his start in the NFL as an intern in the Houston Texans' pro scouting department in 2001, McGaughey gained experience coaching on the professional level as a minority intern with the Kansas City Chiefs during training camp in 2001 before being hired as an assistant special teams coach in 2002. McGaughey worked with Hall of Fame kicker Morten Anderson and Pro Bowl punt returner Dante Hall who tied for the league lead with three combined kick return touchdowns in 2002.

In between his internship and full-time position with the Chiefs, McGaughey spent the spring of 2002 in NFL Europe as the Scottish Claymores defensive backs coach and special teams coordinator, helping the team rank at or near the top of the league in punting average, punt return average, kickoff return average and field goal percentage.

McGaughey began his coaching career at Houston as a graduate assistant in 1997 and next handled defensive backs and special teams at Willowridge High School in Houston from 1998-2001.

PLAYING AND PERSONAL
McGaughey played safety for four seasons and was special teams captain as a senior in 1995 at Houston, where he majored in kinesiology and sports administration. He attended training camp with the Cincinnati Bengals in 1996 and spent time on the Philadelphia Eagles’ practice squad later that year. McGaughey then played in NFL Europe and was a member of the Barcelona Dragons team that won the World Bowl in 1997. Last name is pronounced muh-GAY-hee.

HISTORY
Safety: Houston 1991-95. Pro safety: Philadelphia Eagles 1996, Barcelona Dragons (NFLE) 1997. College coach: Houston 1997, 2003-04, Louisiana State 2011-13. Pro coach: Kansas City Chiefs 2002, Denver Broncos 2005-06, New York Giants 2007-10, New York Jets 2014, San Francisco 49ers 2015, joined Panthers in 2016.