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Marty Hurney
General Manager

Bio

A tireless worker, who investigates every possibility in his quest to improve the Panthers, Marty Hurney has been Carolina's general manager since 2002. During that time, the Panthers have made three playoff appearances, won an NFC Championship, claimed two NFC South titles, been to two NFC Championship games and played in a Super Bowl.

From 2002-09, Carolina compiled the seventh-best record in the NFL and now will look to rejoin the league's elite. Hurney oversaw a significant step in that direction in 2011 with the selection of quarterback Cam Newton, who was named the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year after his record-setting season.

Newton joined center Ryan Kalil, tackle Jordan Gross, linebacker Jon Beason, running back DeAngelo Williams and former Panthers defensive end Julius Peppers as Hurney draft choices who have appeared in the Pro Bowl. Free agent signings Jake Delhomme, Stephen Davis, Mark Fields and Mike Wahle also played in the postseason all-star game.

Hurney has put together a string of successful first-round selections since assuming his responsibilities in 2002. Gross was chosen in 2003 and has developed into one of the NFL's premier tackles. Cornerback Chris Gamble, who ranks first in team history in interceptions, followed a year later, and then came linebacker Thomas Davis in 2005, Williams in 2006, Beason in 2007, and running back Jonathan Stewart and tackle Jeff Otah in 2008 before Newton last year.

Hurney has also shown an imagination and ability to multiply picks to strengthen the roster. In 2007, he traded Carolina's first-round selection (11th overall) to the New York Jets in exchange for their first-round choice (25th overall) and second-round pick. Hurney proceeded to take Beason with the first-round selection and Kalil with the second-round choice, and both have played in the Pro Bowl.

It is a resume that has brought favorable notice to Hurney, who was second in NFL Executive of the Year balloting in 2003 and recognized by Forbes.com as one of the top 10 executives in professional sports in 2007. A year earlier, FoxSports.com had given him the same honor. Most recently, a poll by The Sporting News ranked Hurney third among the NFL's general managers for first-round value in the draft behind the Baltimore Ravens' Ozzie Newsome and former Indianapolis Colts' executive Bill Polian.

The ability to find value has not been limited to the draft under Hurney. Veteran free agent signings have included Davis, Delhomme, Fields, wide receiver Ricky Proehl and tight end Jeremy Shockey.

The respect Hurney has earned in the league was reflected in his appointment to the NFL General Managers Advisory Committee, which provides feedback to the NFL's football operations department.

Despite his success, Hurney is still more comfortable behind the scenes. It was that management style Carolina Panthers Owner/Founder Jerry Richardson saw in Hurney when he promoted him to general manager. The promotion was the culmination of a 15-year NFL apprenticeship under some of the game's most astute coaches and executives, and Hurney has demonstrated that the lessons were well-learned.

Hurney joined the Panthers in 1998 from the San Diego Chargers and managed the salary cap under head coaches Dom Capers and George Seifert. As general manager, Hurney oversees the salary cap while coordinating the different areas of football operations with head coach Ron Rivera and the team's college and pro scouting departments.

Hurney first caught the eye of former Washington Redskins Owner Jack Kent Cooke as a reporter covering the team's championship runs in the 1980s. Developing an association with Cooke, head coach Joe Gibbs and general manager Bobby Beathard, Hurney joined the Redskins public relations department in 1988. In 1990, Hurney moved with Beathard to San Diego, serving as the general manager's assistant with responsibilities that included organizing the scouting department and player contracts and overseeing the day-to-day football administration.

With the advent of the salary cap in 1993, Hurney emerged as the club's specialist in compliance management to the agreement, earning distinction as both an administrator and negotiator and playing an integral role in San Diego's AFC Championship in 1994.

A native of Wheaton, Md., Hurney graduated from Catholic University in Washington, D.C., and began his career as a journalist with the Montgomery Journal in Silver Spring, Md. In 1978, he moved to the Washington Star and worked on that paper for three years before going to the Washington Times, where he spent five years as a beat writer covering the Redskins. Hurney and his wife, Jeannie, have two sons, Joe and James.

A tireless worker, who investigates every possibility in his quest to improve the Panthers, Marty Hurney has been Carolina's general manager since 2002. During that time, the Panthers have made three playoff appearances, won an NFC Championship, claimed two NFC South titles, been to two NFC Championship games and played in a Super Bowl.

From 2002-09, Carolina compiled the seventh-best record in the NFL and now will look to rejoin the league's elite. Hurney oversaw a significant step in that direction in 2011 with the selection of quarterback Cam Newton, who was named the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year after his record-setting season.

Newton joined center Ryan Kalil, tackle Jordan Gross, linebacker Jon Beason, running back DeAngelo Williams and former Panthers defensive end Julius Peppers as Hurney draft choices who have appeared in the Pro Bowl. Free agent signings Jake Delhomme, Stephen Davis, Mark Fields and Mike Wahle also played in the postseason all-star game.

Hurney has put together a string of successful first-round selections since assuming his responsibilities in 2002. Gross was chosen in 2003 and has developed into one of the NFL's premier tackles. Cornerback Chris Gamble, who ranks first in team history in interceptions, followed a year later, and then came linebacker Thomas Davis in 2005, Williams in 2006, Beason in 2007, and running back Jonathan Stewart and tackle Jeff Otah in 2008 before Newton last year.

Hurney has also shown an imagination and ability to multiply picks to strengthen the roster. In 2007, he traded Carolina's first-round selection (11th overall) to the New York Jets in exchange for their first-round choice (25th overall) and second-round pick. Hurney proceeded to take Beason with the first-round selection and Kalil with the second-round choice, and both have played in the Pro Bowl.

It is a resume that has brought favorable notice to Hurney, who was second in NFL Executive of the Year balloting in 2003 and recognized by Forbes.com as one of the top 10 executives in professional sports in 2007. A year earlier, FoxSports.com had given him the same honor. Most recently, a poll by The Sporting News ranked Hurney third among the NFL's general managers for first-round value in the draft behind the Baltimore Ravens' Ozzie Newsome and former Indianapolis Colts' executive Bill Polian.

The ability to find value has not been limited to the draft under Hurney. Veteran free agent signings have included Davis, Delhomme, Fields, wide receiver Ricky Proehl and tight end Jeremy Shockey.

The respect Hurney has earned in the league was reflected in his appointment to the NFL General Managers Advisory Committee, which provides feedback to the NFL's football operations department.

Despite his success, Hurney is still more comfortable behind the scenes. It was that management style Carolina Panthers Owner/Founder Jerry Richardson saw in Hurney when he promoted him to general manager. The promotion was the culmination of a 15-year NFL apprenticeship under some of the game's most astute coaches and executives, and Hurney has demonstrated that the lessons were well-learned.

Hurney joined the Panthers in 1998 from the San Diego Chargers and managed the salary cap under head coaches Dom Capers and George Seifert. As general manager, Hurney oversees the salary cap while coordinating the different areas of football operations with head coach Ron Rivera and the team's college and pro scouting departments.

Hurney first caught the eye of former Washington Redskins Owner Jack Kent Cooke as a reporter covering the team's championship runs in the 1980s. Developing an association with Cooke, head coach Joe Gibbs and general manager Bobby Beathard, Hurney joined the Redskins public relations department in 1988. In 1990, Hurney moved with Beathard to San Diego, serving as the general manager's assistant with responsibilities that included organizing the scouting department and player contracts and overseeing the day-to-day football administration.

With the advent of the salary cap in 1993, Hurney emerged as the club's specialist in compliance management to the agreement, earning distinction as both an administrator and negotiator and playing an integral role in San Diego's AFC Championship in 1994.

A native of Wheaton, Md., Hurney graduated from Catholic University in Washington, D.C., and began his career as a journalist with the Montgomery Journal in Silver Spring, Md. In 1978, he moved to the Washington Star and worked on that paper for three years before going to the Washington Times, where he spent five years as a beat writer covering the Redskins. Hurney and his wife, Jeannie, have two sons, Joe and James.

 

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