Skip to main content
Advertising
2-7-Sec_Campaign_KV_2000x500
From the ground up: How the Panthers are retooling Bryce Young's footwork to slow down time

From the ground up: How the Panthers are retooling Bryce Young's footwork to slow down time

How much time is enough for a quarterback? In the span it takes most people to say their name, passers are asked to cover ground, assess a puzzle of scattered pieces, then put it back together, making the correct play, all while someone who is often a mountain disguised as a man is barreling towards them at full speed.

It's why, when Panthers head coach Dave Canales stated in his opening press conference after being hired that he'd like Bryce Young to get the ball out in 2.7 seconds or less, the number jumped out.

Happy Half Hour: The 2.7 Project (Feat. Jake Delhomme)

Happy Half Hour: The 2.7 Project (Feat. Jake Delhomme)

A good quarterback can thrive in chaos. A great quarterback can slow down time to negate the chaos. Dave Canales has spent this offseason thus far helping quarterback Bryce Young get his throwing timing down to 2.7 seconds. To understand the intracies of the challenge, the Happy Half Hour spoke to one of the best passers in Panthers history, Jake Dellohome, to find out what it takes to lower a throwing time, what the timeline looks like and just how much of a difference it really makes in a win versus a loss.

Following the blueprint: Coaches work to tighten release time

Following the blueprint: Coaches work to tighten release time

Coaches and analysts around the National Football League have spent decades, uncountable dollars and even longer hours, all to solve one equation; what is the ideal amount time for which a quarterback to throw the ball?

A trio of coaches specifically—Andy Reid of the Kansas City Chiefs, Doug Pederson of the Jacksonville Jaguars and Mike McDaniel of the Miami Dolphins—peeled back the curtain a bit on what it takes to evaluate and then mold a quarterback for the NFL, a process that achieves many goals, not the least of which can lower a passer's throwing time. With that in mind, here is what two Super Bowl winning coaches and the man behind the league's best offense last season had to offer on the subject.

Happy Half Hour: The 2.7 Project- Eugene Robinson

Happy Half Hour: The 2.7 Project- Eugene Robinson

When a quarterback makes tweaks to their game, there is a ripple effect that touches every person on the field. Continuing our offseason look into the Panthers challenge to lower Bryce Young's throwing time to 2.7 seconds, Panthers.com and the Happy Half Hour talks with former Carolina Panther safety Eugene Robinson, to find out how a sub-three second throw changes a defensive game plan, and what a quarterback can do to negate a secondary.

Advertising